liberation theology... and other emerging theologies

If you have an overwhelming urge to explore the weightier theological ideas, this is the place to seek fellow-travellers.
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queermulla
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liberation theology... and other emerging theologies

Post by queermulla » Sun Aug 09, 2009 4:57 am

WW2 and the holocaust particularly has left an indelible mark on Christianity, one in which it may not fully recover from... as it struggles with its collective conscience and particularly its failure to respond to Nazism

from my particular faith tradition (for those who haven't already twigged to it - Catholicism) the 2nd Vat Council was an apparatus construed to face the collective guilt of that terrible event

one emergent factor/spirit that arose from this miracle event - was the influence and desire for liberation

still trying to be put back by the Ecclesiastes - into the hermeneutic Systematic box in which it sprung forth from, praxis - it is know today as collectively: liberation theology; or as I prefer... "a theology of liberation"

today it has many offshoots.... queer, feminist, environmental, black, minjung, coconut theology

but at its core it seeks to redress social disadvantage and offer analysis as to what the church's role is, in instigating and/or empowering those who would seek to address such issues

a guiding and simple praxis of methodology in guiding my search for the truth today... is forever influenced by the the phrase: 'preferential option for the poor'
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Pam
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Re: liberation theology... and other emerging theologies

Post by Pam » Sun Aug 09, 2009 12:50 pm

What in particular would you like people to comment on/engage with?

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queermulla
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Re: liberation theology... and other emerging theologies

Post by queermulla » Sun Aug 09, 2009 1:41 pm

as compared to liberation theology... how does the way others do theology (God talk) bring about effective change in people's lives and their communities with a view to changing endemic poverty and systematic discrimination
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Isobel
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Re: liberation theology... and other emerging theologies

Post by Isobel » Sun Aug 09, 2009 9:03 pm

I don't know loads about liberation theology and a lot of your post went right over my head but I do think that the gospels show Jesus prioritising issues of inequality and poverty and this is often sidelined by some branches of christianity.
I thought liberation theology arose in South America and other developing countries rather than in relation to WW2 but as I said I don't know a lot about it.

enyaj

Re: liberation theology... and other emerging theologies

Post by enyaj » Wed Aug 12, 2009 10:43 am

IMR wrote:I don't know loads about liberation theology and a lot of your post went right over my head but I do think that the gospels show Jesus prioritising issues of inequality and poverty and this is often sidelined by some branches of christianity.
I thought liberation theology arose in South America and other developing countries rather than in relation to WW2 but as I said I don't know a lot about it.
The historical roots of liberation theology are to be found in the prophetic tradition of evangelists and missionaries from the earliest colonial days in Latin America -- churchmen who questioned the type of presence adopted by the church and the way indigenous peoples, blacks, mestizos, and the poor rural and urban masses were treated. The names of Bartolomé de Las Casas, Antonio de Montesinos, Antonio Vieira, Brother Caneca and others can stand for a whole host of religious personalities who have graced every century of our short history. They we the source of the type of social and ecclesial understanding that is emerging today.

See: <http://www.landreform.org/boff2.htm> for full article.

Jayne( in aroha, hope and Faith ) nz

* . (\ *** /) * .* Be beautiful inside, in your hearts,
* . * ( \(_)/ ) * * with the lasting charm of a gentle
* * (_ /||\_) . * And quiet spirit, that is
* *. /____\ * . so precious to God
(1 Peter 3:4 TLB)

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Re: liberation theology... and other emerging theologies

Post by christine » Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:36 am

One could argue that the OT prophets flagged up liberation theology. Words from Amos reached me in adolescence 'Let justice roll down like waters and righteousness like an everlasting stream' along with 'I hate I despise your feast days and take no delight in your solemn assemblies.'

In essence Liberation Theology is the gospel - links with the parable of the sheep and the goats - its adherents espouse empty religiosity and look for and advocate social action - transforming the unjust structures of society etc etc (the latter is one of the C of E's 5 marks of mission not that one would realise it!!)

One of the inspirational figures in Liberation Theology was Archbishop Romero - it's well worth reading his life story.

This rather long quote from Introducing Liberation Theology: Clodovis Boff gives one the picture



p. 3 ‘Every true theology springs from a spirituality – that is, from a true meeting with God in history. Liberation theology was born when faith confronted the injustice done to the poor….We mean a collective poor…. The poor are also the workers exploited by the capitalist system; the underemployed, those pushed aside by the production process – a reserve army always at hand to take the place of the employed; they are the labourers of the countryside, and migrant workers with only seasonal work. ….In the light of faith, Christians see in them the challenging face of the Suffering Servant, Jesus Christ. At first there is silence, silent and sorrowful contemplation, as if in the presence of a mystery that calls for introspection and prayer. Then this presence speaks. The Crucified in these crucified persons weeps and cries out: I was hungry …in prison…naked’ (Matt.25:3146).


The Crucified needs to be raised to life. We are on the side of the poor only when we struggle alongside them against the poverty that has been unjustly created and forced on them.



p. 1 ‘One day, in the arid region of northeastern Brazil, one of the most famine stricken parts of the world, I (Clodovis) met a bishop going into his house; he was shaking. ‘Bishop, what’s the matter?’ I asked. He replied that he had just seen a terrible sight: in front of the cathedral was a woman with three small children and a baby clinging to her neck. He saw that they were fainting from hunger. The baby seemed to be dead. He said ‘Give the baby some milk, woman!’ ‘I can’t, my lord,’ she answered. The bishop went on insisting that she should, and she that she could not. Finally because of his insistence, she opened her blouse. Her breast was bleeding; the baby sucked violently at it. And sucked blood. The mother who had given it life was feeding it, like the pelican, with her own blood, her own life. The bishop knelt down in front of the woman, placed his hand on the baby’s head, and there and then vowed that as long as such hunger existed, he would feed at least one hungry child each day.



I heard the latter in a sermon preached in a High Anglican church just before the priest left for a prestigious post elsewhere.

The emphasis above is mine

Christine :cross:





This extract - rather long - from another book - describes the approach well.

enyaj

Re: liberation theology... and other emerging theologies

Post by enyaj » Wed Aug 26, 2009 11:14 am

christine wrote: The bishop knelt down in front of the woman, placed his hand on the baby’s head, and there and then vowed that as long as such hunger existed, he would feed at least one hungry child each day.[/b]
In essence, do we cross over and walk by, or do we take on the responsibility of giving succour with all the cost and inconvienence such help might demand of us?

Surely it matters not whether we are liberal or conservative in our theology, what does matter is that we pay heed to the teachings of the Christ, with a good deal more than lip service.

Jayne (in Aroha, Hope, and Love. ) nz

. * . (\ *** /) * . You may be dissapointed
* . * ( \(_)/ ) * * if you fail, but you are
. . (_ /||\_) . * doomed if you don't try
* . /____\ *..*

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