Micromoon

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Joe Parrish
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Micromoon

Post by Joe Parrish » Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:12 am

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-ne ... 180973103/

Tonight, my friends, at 11:32 pm Central Time, the Harvest Moon will be full at its apogee, a Micromoon - that is, it is the farthest away from the earth as it gets, in its elliptical orbit around the earth. This means it will look (if we can see it) appreciably smaller than at other times, most pointedly when the moon is at its perigee- or closest point in its orbit to the earth. When a full moon occurs at its perigee, it is called a Supermoon.

According to the Northwest Arkansas Weather Authority, the last time Friday the 13th and the full micromoon coincided was 1832; and the next time will be 2524 - more than 500 years from now! According to the Farmers’ Almanac, the last time a full moon split time zones on Friday the 13th was June 2014. The last nationwide Friday the 13th full moon was in October 2000 and it won’t happen again until August 2049. This last makes me feel a little better. You may have noted that I used Central Time to tell of the exact moment the moon will be full, because on the East Coast it will actually be 12:32 am, and that, of course, means it will technically be Saturday, September 14. So we on the East Coast will not really be able to enjoy whatever the benefits are of a triple coincidence of Friday the 13th/Micromoon/Harvest Moon - which is the last full moon before the start of Autumn on September 23. I knew you all wanted to know this, so I did the research!


Tonight, my friends, at 11:32 pm Central Time, the Harvest Moon will be full at its apogee, a Micromoon - that is, it is the farthest away from the earth as it gets, in its elliptical orbit around the earth. This means it will look (if we can see it) appreciably smaller than at other times, most pointedly when the moon is at its perigee- or closest point in its orbit to the earth. When a full moon occurs at its perigee, it is called a Supermoon.

According to the Northwest Arkansas Weather Authority, the last time Friday the 13th and the full micromoon coincided was 1832; and the next time will be 2524 - more than 500 years from now! According to the Farmers’ Almanac, the last time a full moon split time zones on Friday the 13th was June 2014. The last nationwide Friday the 13th full moon was in October 2000 and it won’t happen again until August 2049. This last makes me feel a little better. You may have noted that I used Central Time to tell of the exact moment the moon will be full, because on the East Coast it will actually be 12:32 am, and that, of course, means it will technically be Saturday, September 14. So we on the East Coast will not really be able to enjoy whatever the benefits are of a triple coincidence of Friday the 13th/Micromoon/Harvest Moon - which is the last full moon before the start of Autumn on September 23. I knew you all wanted to know this, so I did the research!

Bishop Assistant Mary Glasspool of the Diocese of New York

This tidbit should enliven our perspective of how fleeting time is.
Love one another while the moon still shines.
And the sun.
Peace and blessings,
Joe

User avatar
Joe Parrish
Posts: 1163
Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 6:33 pm
Location: Antigua, New York City, and New York and New Jersey and Connecticut and Tennessee, USA
Contact:

Micromoon

Post by Joe Parrish » Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:28 am

Hickup of previous post ascribed to moonishness on the 13th.
Peace and blessings,
Joe

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